Stuart Price
Last Updated

No worries! Shrubs, ground cover and even certain types of vegetables are suitable substitutes for hedges if they are too tall or wide for your backyard or garden. You might be surprised by what is on our list!

  • Shrubs
  • Ground Cover
  • Some Vegetables Are Good Hedge Substitutes, Too
  • Other Things You Need to Know About Planting a Hedge

Related read: Your Guide to the 10 Best Hedge Trimmers in 2021

Shrubs

Shrubs are an excellent way to add some greenery and create boundaries for your property. They can also help shield you from the noise of the outside world, which is especially important if you live near a busy street or highway.

Some of our favourite shrubs to plant as a hedge:

  • Forsythia
  • Dwarf Mugo Pine
  • Rhododendron (best for colder climates)
  • Boxwood (adds greenery and life to the autumn months)
  • Rose of Sharon (great for flowerbeds!)
  • Dwarf Korean Lilac (simplicity at its finest)
Ground Cover

Ground cover is a popular way to section off the property or even create boundaries in your yard because it doesn’t require pruning or any upkeep. It also adds greenery to your garden without taking up too much space!

Some of our favourite ground cover options are:

  • Alyssum
  • Sedum (great for slopes)
  • Ivy (breaks difficult soil, which is perfect if you live in a desert climate)
  • Liquorice plant (suitable for slopes)
  • Sweet woodruff
  • Creeping Jenny
Some Vegetables

Some vegetables are also great to use as a hedge or border for your yard, which is perfect if you want to pack some extra colour into your garden!

Some of our favourite vegetables to use as a hedge are:

  • Snow peas
  • Zucchini (perfect for balconies or patios)
  • Red Potatoes (grows nice and tall!)
  • Pumpkins (an excellent way to decorate in autumn time)
  • Tomatoes (another great summertime decoration)
Other Things You Need to Know About Planting a Hedge

Hedges are an excellent way to add some greenery and create boundaries for your property. They can also help shield you from the noise of the outside world, which is especially important if you live near a busy street or highway.

  • Shrubs are often used as hedges because they grow over time and typically don’t need much maintenance. The downside is that they may not provide as much privacy or barrier against noise as other plants might.
  • Groundcover plants like ivy will also work well for smaller spaces with less light exposure, but make sure to water them regularly so they won’t dry out too much.
  • If you would like something a bit more vibrant and high-maintenance, try planting ornamental grasses instead.
  • You will want to plant your new hedge near the street or sidewalk so that it won’t grow into your neighbour’s yard!
  • A border fence privet is a good option, which can grow up to 20 feet tall and keep its leaves year-round.
  • Another good option is the golden raintree, which does well in full sunlight and can reach a height of 25 feet – be careful what you plant underneath it because it can leave stains on the pavement!
  • If you don’t have room for a full hedge, you can plant short hedges around the edges of your yard. The Buttonbush and the soaptree yucca work well because they grow in much smaller spaces than other plants.
  • Don’t forget to fertilize your new shrubs or ground covers every spring! And during dry seasons, make sure to water them regularly, so they don’t die.
  • If you plant your new hedge in the winter or early spring, make sure to give it six months before expecting any results!
  • Shrubs work well because they grow in size over time and typically require minimal maintenance. The downside is that it may not provide as much privacy or a barrier against noise as other plants might.
Conclusion

If you want to create a boundary for your property, but don’t have enough space for the traditional hedge plantings, try planting shrubs or ground cover instead! These plants will provide some privacy and greenery without taking up too much space.

Be sure to check with your local government and see what types of plants you’re allowed to plant as a hedgerow. Some places will only allow certain fruits and vegetables, while others might not allow anything at all. If this is the case, don’t give up on using your garden as a way to create boundaries–try planting shrubs, ground cover or even flowers instead!


Sources:

http://www.unep.org/wed/12thCongress/pdfs/3_5_en.pdf
https://greenversusgrey.wordpress.com/2012/04/05/planting-a-hedge-without-taking-up-too-much-space
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/install-groundcover-landscape-winter-38898.html#page=1
http://www.treesftf.org/northwestnursery/education/planting_shrubs.htm
https://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/italian-olive-trees.htm
http://www.rooftreecare.co.uk/shrubs-for-hedge/
https://www.perennialnurseries.com/blog/2014/1/5/shrubs-for-hedges?rq=shrubs%20for%20hedges
http://www.landscapeonline.com/how-to/articles/11628/1/watering-tips-for-winter-and-spring.aspx
http://www.perennialnurseries.com/blog/?p=3

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